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  • Big Problems in Hitsville

    by coldwarrior ( 90 Comments › )
    Filed under Open thread at May 5th, 2017 - 3:54 am

    I have watched with great pain the music industry collapse over the past 20 years. Innovation and cutting edge risk is replaced by auto-tuned mediocrity and generic choreography that is meant to cover up the severe lack of talent for what is being put out there now by record companies who are seeing their revenue dry up.

    As the money pool dries up, record companies take less and less risk. This is how we end up with the current crew of no-talent hustlers in the top 40. The record companies have to appeal to the masses more than ever before to make a profit. Hey, McDonald’s is successful doing just the same thing. Thank God they aren’t the only outlet for food! A simple perusal of the top 40 in the past versus that of last year is fairly clear that the homogenization, the McDonald’sing if you will, is killing music. The 2016 list is not of diverse acts, not like in the past. The 2016 list is the same act, over and over again; repackaged just slightly. The 1979 list that I selected by random is quite diverse in comparison.

    Top 40 1979

    Top 40 2016

    Am I being that old guy who says “Modern Music Sucks! Back in my day….” Well, no, I’m not. there are plenty of really talented bands out there but they aren’t getting the chances and opportunities that were there in the past. Below is some of the reasons why:

    How The Music Industry Is Putting Itself Out Of Business

    There was once a time when mid-level bands with a modest following could make a pretty decent living playing music. They’d put out a record, sell a couple hundred thousand copies and then go on tour to promote it – which would drive additional sales, even as the tour itself was lucky to break even.

    For the largest acts, this formula was a bona fide moneymaking bonanza, lining the pockets of all involved, including the musicians, managers, promoters and record labels. For everyone else, it didn’t produce vast riches but nonetheless supported careers and promoted the creation of new music.

    Times, however, have changed. Besides a handful of superstars, it’s impossible for bands and musicians to generate significant revenue taking this approach. And the reason is simple: Consumers won’t pay much for music.

    Napster jump-started this trend back in the 90s, pirating content and making it available online, producing a generation of listeners who didn’t value music because they were able to download it for free. Then, streaming services basically continued the practice.

    The likes of Pandora and Spotify don’t steal content, but they still offer it for free with the support of ads. Others such as Apple Music and Amazon Music obviously aren’t stealing either and do charge users, but it’s a nominal fee. Both models result in most artists getting the shaft, receiving, in most instances, less than a penny per stream.

    (Incidentally, the streaming services themselves aren’t faring much better. Pandora and Spotify have always struggled to turn a profit, while Apple Music and Amazon Music are money losers, in place as part of broader distribution play that merely supports other parts of their company’s other businesses. Another irony is that music has become devalued at a time when there are more ways than ever to promote it, thanks to social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat.)

    Because of this, musicians have had to adjust. Some have begun to focus their efforts on brand building, using their music, in effect, as a form of advertising to hock products and services for companies. Megastars like Beyonce and Lady Gaga, and Michael Jackson before them, have always done this, pushing everything from soft drinks to clothing to fragrances.

    But more and more, musicians from across the spectrum are pursuing this path to prosper. One good example is Gary Clark Jr., a talented artist but hardly a household name who has endorsement deals with Lincoln and John Varvatos. In the past, purists probably would have called him a “sell out.” Now, it’s called getting paid.

    Ostensibly, playing concerts is another way to boost the bottom line. But save a precious few, most musicians are neither able to draw big audiences nor command the type of prices that make touring worthwhile – and the ones who can are senior citizens who play to audiences that are either roughly the same age or only slightly younger.

    Bruce Springsteen (67), Paul McCartney (75) and the Rolling Stones (formed in 1962) were among the top-grossing acts last year. Also on that list was Guns N’ Roses, the founding members of which are all in their fifties. Even the surviving original members of the Grateful Dead tour successfully more the 20 years after the death of Jerry Garcia. An orchestra ticket for their upcoming show at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles goes for nearly $400.

    Who are the next generation of stars that will replace these aging performers, and does it matter given the current generation’s preference for festivals like Coachella, where the music is almost incidental to the experience?

    Some probably question why anyone should care about all this. After all, the consumer is winning, since the principal fallout has been that accessing music content is cheaper than ever before. Further, large industries have always gone through difficult transformations – what makes the music industry’s struggles any more noteworthy?

    The reason is that without meaningful changes to the way musicians get compensated, creativity will suffer immeasurably – and with it, the entire music industry. Consider that the revenue streams created by record sales and concerts once formed an informal infrastructure that continually bred new artists. Without such revenue streams in place – or something similar to replace them – the time will come when musicians will have no practical way to stay afloat, forcing them to give up and many would-be ones never to try at all.

    All of which means that the music business may not be a much of business at all before too long.

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    90 Responses to “Big Problems in Hitsville”
    ( jump to bottom )

    1. coldwarrior
      1 | May 5, 2017 4:20 am

      i try to get to as many shows as i can, none of them are top 40. i do subscribe to amazon music, qello, and nugs.net. if i really like a band i will buy the cd or if i really really like them i’ll buy the vinyl.

      that said, this paragraph is just sad:

      Bruce Springsteen (67), Paul McCartney (75) and the Rolling Stones (formed in 1962) were among the top-grossing acts last year. Also on that list was Guns N’ Roses, the founding members of which are all in their fifties. Even the surviving original members of the Grateful Dead tour successfully more the 20 years after the death of Jerry Garcia. An orchestra ticket for their upcoming show at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles goes for nearly $400.

      (and i dont think i could go see the dead without jerry….it would be too depressing)


    2. coldwarrior
      2 | May 5, 2017 4:44 am

      IHeartMedia Inc, the largest owner of U.S. radio stations, said there was substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern.
      IHeartMedia, which said it has more than a quarter of a billion monthly radio listeners in the United States, is struggling to find a solution that would significantly slash its debt pile outside of bankruptcy court.

      As of March 31, the company had debt of $20.37 billion and total assets of $12.27 billion. It had $365 million of cash and cash equivalents on its balance sheet as of March 31.

      IHeartMedia indicated in a regulatory filing on April 20 that it would issue a going concern warning.

      IHeart, formerly known as Clear Channel Communications Inc, was taken over by private equity firms BainCapital LLC and Thomas H. Lee Partners through a leveraged buyout in 2008 for $26.7 billion, piling up the company with huge debts.

      The company hosts syndicated radio shows of celebrities such as Steve Harvey, Ryan Seacrest and Rush Limbaugh.

      Separately, the company reported a first-quarter net loss of $388.2 million, compared with $88.5 million a year earlier.

      gee, the economic vampires at bain strike again.


    3. 3 | May 5, 2017 8:05 am

      eaglesoars wrote:

      Oh dear God, make it stop. I’M going to develop PTSD pretty soon.
      The name of Hillary’s new PAC is – wait for it
      ONWARD TOGETHER!
      She didn’t get the Mussolini reference for ‘Stronger Together’, maybe she doesn’t get this one either
      Or maybe she does.

      And yet it’s Republicans who are ‘fascists’.


    4. 4 | May 5, 2017 9:43 am

      Funny you should bring up “The Industry”. I love Pandora and play it at my desk. Yesterday I was playing the 60’s Golden Oldies and everyone stopped by lamented the lack of real talent in the music business these days.

      You don’t need need studio musicians and arrangers anymore. You need a computer and pre-programmed beats. Percussionists were alarmed when the first “drum machines” were showing up on disco. Now they seem to have replaced just about everybody else.

      Auto-tune is a disgrace.


    5. eaglesoars
      5 | May 5, 2017 9:48 am

      coldwarrior wrote:

      gee, the economic vampires at bain strike again.

      There’s another one – I think it’s Cumulus? – that has owners that are really liberal. They tried America Air and chased Hannity away. I wonder how they’re doing. And what about Sirirus, which is subscription?
      o
      Back to bands – Brooks and Dunn quit touring I think because it is no longer economically sustainable. And there’s very little you can’t get on youtube these days. the Stones kind of set the bar way too high with their live acts – it costs a fortune to put on shows like that. But even with all that, I THINK country acts are doing better than rock and roll. Their fans don’t expect much more than a good concert, they don’t care much for the fireworks. The only reason Kiss is still alive is because Gene Simmons is a smart business man and sells trademarked totchkes. I don’t think their shows break even.

      But the only acts I would pay to see these days are the Stones – that’s a bucket list thing – and Tina Turner, because she is the Goddess of the Universe and I’m going to be like her when I grow up.

      right_wing2 wrote:

      And yet it’s Republicans who are ‘fascists’.

      In all seriousness, a lot of these people need to be re-educated.


    6. eaglesoars
      6 | May 5, 2017 9:49 am

      Deplorable Barbarian wrote:

      I love Pandora

      what is that? I’ve heard of it and I’m my usual clueless self.


    7. 7 | May 5, 2017 10:15 am

      Well, since you went there. Here is the article I wrote for ZDNet back on June 1st 2000. (This is what got me invited to testify before Congress)

      Napster and the indy musician

      Edition: US

      Musician Stephen Walker sees hard times ahead for independent artists like him unless MP3 swappers change their evil ways.
      Stephen Walker

      By Stephen Walker | June 1, 2000 — 00:00 GMT (17:00 PDT) | Topic: Enterprise Software

      Back in the good old days, we called the unlawful acquisition of copyrighted material piracy. As self-styled swashbucklers, our attitude was “Yeah, we’re stealing. So what?”

      That’s why I don’t have much use for the new defense from supporters of Napster Inc. who slam bands (such as Metallica) who are upholding their copyrights: “This isn’t stealing, and even if it were, I wouldn’t be stealing if you weren’t such greedy bastards.”

      That new way of thinking might hold water with big-money bands, but it springs a leak when it comes to guys like me: independent musicians who are trying to make a living off their music without the support of major labels.

      When did the attitude change? I’m not talking about ancient history here; I’m talking about the good old days around the rise of the Net!

      Maybe you’re old enough to recall the late ’80s and early ’90s, or maybe you’re too young to remember before the Gold Rush of 1993 — but I remember! I was there.

      I recall the late ’80s when “going online” meant calling up someone’s computer to access their BBS. I remember before there was HTML and poking around in a mainframe computer was considered hacking. (Most companies’ mainframe OSes were so customized that just knowing Unix wasn’t enough to let you look around.)

      What has all this to do with Napster? Everything!

      I am a musician — an “indy,” which means I’m not signed to any large record company. And like many other indy musicians I have been watching this whole Napster deal with quite a bit of concern. Where and how will the chips fall, and how will they stack up for musicians like me?

      I began to see some very disturbing elements in the whole debate. Napster could really be of great benefit to indy musicians, were it not for the behavior of its customers.

      In their mad rush to justify unlawful downloading of copyrighted material, these users are giving Napster and any program like it a bad name, while forcing a draconian change in the copyright laws that will probably place the creation of or use of Napster (or Napster-like software) in the same legal category as viruses: illegal to own and illegal to use!

      Some of you might think that these kind of legal steps won’t matter or that nobody will be prosecuted for using this kind of software. Try telling that to any one of those 1.2 million Americans who are in prison right now for using illegal drugs. Use drugs, go to prison; use the wrong software and go to prison. (It’s not that great a leap; just ask the guy who wrote the Melissa virus.)

      Just how do we indies feel about this whole issue? Well, the term “burnt” does come to mind. What could be one of the greatest tools any indy musician ever got the chance to use is likely to blow up in our faces.

      If the RIAA is the music industry’s version of Count Dracula, what is Napster? Can you imagine anything so evil that you would ever consider asking a vampire for help against it? (Or even worse, that would prompt a vampire to say yes?)

      Put this in perspective: What if it was your money being threatened? If you were the one being told you don’t deserve to earn a living? That everyone else in the world should be allowed to take anything you create, any time they want, without compensating you? In fact, that there is something seriously wrong with you for expecting to be compensated for you work?

      It’s easy to see how this issue could become extremely personal, isn’t it? And that’s exactly what those people who are advocating the use of Napster or other software like it are telling the musical community. And it’s us indies who are hearing it the loudest.

      Stephen Walker started playing guitar at 14 and got his B.F.A. in music in 1986 from the United States International University in San Diego. He has played in five or six bands in the San Diego area over the past 25 or so years. In 1991 his band Dorian Grey formed its own record label (Loud Records) and released a four-song EP; it sold so well that Loud Records promptly went bankrupt. After the 1996 murder of Dorian Grey bassist William “Bill” Rill, the band broke up. Since then, Walker has worked on his own material, much of which is available in MP3 format.


    8. 8 | May 5, 2017 10:18 am

      eaglesoars wrote:

      Deplorable Barbarian wrote:

      I love Pandora

      what is that? I’ve heard of it and I’m my usual clueless self.

      Online digital streaming music service.

      http://www.pandora.com/


    9. eaglesoars
      9 | May 5, 2017 10:40 am

      @ doriangrey:

      ok, I’ve got about 6 stations up and running thanks I am now completely ruined


    10. 10 | May 5, 2017 10:54 am

      coldwarrior wrote:

      i try to get to as many shows as i can, none of them are top 40. i do subscribe to amazon music, qello, and nugs.net. if i really like a band i will buy the cd or if i really really like them i’ll buy the vinyl.

      that said, this paragraph is just sad:

      Bruce Springsteen (67), Paul McCartney (75) and the Rolling Stones (formed in 1962) were among the top-grossing acts last year. Also on that list was Guns N’ Roses, the founding members of which are all in their fifties. Even the surviving original members of the Grateful Dead tour successfully more the 20 years after the death of Jerry Garcia. An orchestra ticket for their upcoming show at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles goes for nearly $400.

      (and i dont think i could go see the dead without jerry….it would be too depressing)

      I stopped going to see the Beach Boys in concert after Carl Wilson died and Mike Love kicked Al Jardine out. I was a die-hard fan and was willing to take the loss of Dennis and the departure of Brian, but I was not going to watch that hammy twerp alone.


    11. 11 | May 5, 2017 10:57 am

      @ eaglesoars:

      Pandora is marvelous in that YOU create the music you want. I have created channels for specific artists – Michael McDonald, Steely Dan, Billy Joel, Sonny Landreth and Jimmy Buffett. Plus genres. I actually subscribe to the “ads fee” service, which is about $5 a month. It also allows endless “fast forward” which the free service does not.

      And just as a sidenote – Pandora’s headquarters is two blocks over from my office in Oakland.


    12. 12 | May 5, 2017 11:19 am

      Deplorable Barbarian wrote:

      I stopped going to see the Beach Boys in concert after Carl Wilson died and Mike Love kicked Al Jardine out. I was a die-hard fan and was willing to take the loss of Dennis and the departure of Brian, but I was not going to watch that hammy twerp alone.

      Cold and I have had some very interesting discussions on this very subject. It bares a direct relevance to precisely how I became a Rock Star.

      There is so much that goes on behind the scenes in any professional recording act that if the fans knew, well, I can only say, most would be shocked.

      First of all and most importantly, all of your favorite bands first and foremost are BUSINESSES. With literally everything that that implies.

      Individual musicians are fungible commodities. The fans DO NOT want to KNOW this, but it is absolutely 100 percent true.

      They are entertainment businesses built on entirely fictional personality constructs. Who for the most part, you think your favorite musician or band are has in reality as much substance to it, as the set upon which your favorite TV show or movie was filmed on do.

      Everything about the music industry right down to how the artist parts their hair and what cloths they wear is carefully crafted for the sole and exclusive purpose of selling a product to a carefully defined market.

      It has honestly been this way since the 1950’s. The band I played for was signed to a bona fide record contract back in 1974. They were signed to an 8 album contract. When the band broke up in 1981 that contract, with 2 albums still on it was inherited by the keyboard player.

      He formed a new band recorded this new bands first album and when a song off that album jumped to #5 on the charts they quickly rescheduled their tour to take advantage of the songs popularity.

      The guitar player who had recorded the album couldn’t make the start of the tour because his first child was born a week before the tour started. That’s where I came in. A Schedule 1099 employee of the band.


    13. eaglesoars
      13 | May 5, 2017 11:22 am

      @ doriangrey:

      so dorian, does Pandora pay the artists for this music? I’m not paying them, obviously, and I don’t see any adverts


    14. 14 | May 5, 2017 11:26 am

      @ doriangrey:

      Back then, fresh out of college, I was very good at sight reading. The band was not a guitar centric band, so all I had to do, was play the basic chords and look good. I was 24, so looking good was real easy.


    15. 15 | May 5, 2017 11:30 am

      eaglesoars wrote:

      @ doriangrey:

      so dorian, does Pandora pay the artists for this music? I’m not paying them, obviously, and I don’t see any adverts

      Yes and no. It all depends on your definition of “PAYING”. All of the streaming music sites pay .0001 cents per song play. The song has to be played a thousand times for the artist to be paid 1 penny.

      Compare that to the rate paid by broadcast radio, which is $.5 per song play where the artist makes a dollar for every 20 song plays.


    16. 16 | May 5, 2017 11:31 am

      @ doriangrey:

      Opps $.05 per song play on the radio.


    17. eaglesoars
      17 | May 5, 2017 11:37 am

      @ doriangrey:

      jesus. that’s about a 6 pack of Bud per month. Then how does Pandora make money?


    18. eaglesoars
      18 | May 5, 2017 11:45 am

      I have to get to work. I have no idea where this day is going.


    19. 19 | May 5, 2017 11:45 am

      eaglesoars wrote:

      @ doriangrey:

      jesus. that’s about a 6 pack of Bud per month. Then how does Pandora make money?

      Volume. Services like Pandora have hundreds of millions of users and tens of millions of subscribers. For every advertisement that they push, they get paid $.001, subscriptions cost from between $5.00 to $15.00 per month. They pay out a fraction of what they take in for content.


    20. 20 | May 5, 2017 12:09 pm

      coldwarrior wrote:

      IHeart, formerly known as Clear Channel Communications Inc, was taken over by private equity firms BainCapital LLC and Thomas H. Lee Partners through a leveraged buyout in 2008 for $26.7 billion, piling up the company with huge debts.

      The cost of trying to buy a presidential election. BainCapital=Mitt Romney. Now you know why the entire so called “Conservative Media” went RINO after the 2008 election. Preparation for the 2012 contest between Obama and Romney.

      Romney made the Generals Nightmare mistake. He planned for the last war, not the war he was going to fight. Same mistake Hillary made. Romney basically purchased Broadcast radio in America, but the average American voter had already moved away from radio. Hillary purchased the Mainstream Media, but again, the average American had already moved beyond the Mainstream Media.

      Like a typical totalitarian when his purchase of Broadcast Radio did not produce the desired results, Romney, aka BainCapital took his anger and frustration out on Broadcast Radio and killed what still remained of it.

      On the positive side, the destruction of iHeartRadio/Clear Channel is the best thing that could possibly happen to broadcast radio. Clear Channel and Jstore owned 95% of all the broadcast radio stations in America. Those two companies decided what was and was not played on 95% of all the radio stations in America.

      They destroyed the unique character of individual radio stations and transformed broadcast radio in America into an unpalatable corporate gruel.

      Rock and roll transformed American Broadcast radio into the behemoth that it was during the 50’s, 60’s 70’s and 80’s. Each individual radio station carefully monitored they likes and dislikes of the community that they serviced. They competed with nearby rival stations to actively engage their audiences.

      After corporate America consolidated its hold on broadcast radio in the mid 80’s, that competition became a Kabuki theater of competition. Reality was, everyone was being fed the same pathetic pablum. The corporate “Risk aversion” that coldwarrior mentioned in his article above started there and quickly infested the record labels whose revenue source was mainly derived from broadcast radio’s ability to allow them to market their products.


    21. 21 | May 5, 2017 12:37 pm

      Shit…. Killed the thread deader than Lily ever could have.


    22. 22 | May 5, 2017 12:45 pm

      doriangrey wrote:

      eaglesoars wrote:

      @ doriangrey:

      so dorian, does Pandora pay the artists for this music? I’m not paying them, obviously, and I don’t see any adverts

      Yes and no. It all depends on your definition of “PAYING”. All of the streaming music sites pay .0001 cents per song play. The song has to be played a thousand times for the artist to be paid 1 penny.

      Compare that to the rate paid by broadcast radio, which is $.5 per song play where the artist makes a dollar for every 20 song plays.

      Phil Collins must have made a mint in the 1980’s. I thought there was an Act of Congress that mandated I hear “Su-su-sudio” once an hour.


    23. 23 | May 5, 2017 12:50 pm

      @ doriangrey:

      Yes they are businesses. My ex is what was known as a fixer. If your drummer couldn’t come up with a decent drum arrangement, he stepped in and came up with one. If your drummer couldn’t play it decently for a recording, he played it on your recording. Sort of an uncredited Hal Blaine. There are a lot of them in the industry, as you probably know.

      I’m always amused when people credit Skunk Baxter with that incredible guitar riff on “Reelin’ in the Years” – because Skunk was a “member” (such as they were) of Steely Dan in those days. Except it was Eliot Randall. Because Skunk couldn’t get it right.


    24. 24 | May 5, 2017 12:55 pm

      Every Republican in the California delegation voted for the AHCA. Nicely done, guys.


    25. 25 | May 5, 2017 1:34 pm

      Deplorable Barbarian wrote:

      Every Republican in the California delegation voted for the AHCA. Nicely done, guys.

      As a show of solidarity, I guess that’s pretty cool. The problem I have is that I still do not trust the GOP Establishment Elites. I am not celebrating the repeal of Obamacare until I know what those CONservatives in the GOP Establishment Elite have foisted off on us.

      They could have repealed Obamacare 6 years ago, but didn’t. They wanted it every bit as much as their Marxist brethren in the democrat party did. At this point I’m not sure this is anything more than the Marxist Elite in our government trying to save their phony baloney jobs.

      Now, with that said.

      I was somewhat pleased to hear that…

      1) The AHCA stripped Congress of its exemption to the AHCA, requiring them to have the exact same Health Care they intend to foist off on the rest of the Nation (at least until they vote to exempt themselves from it again).

      2) Defunded Planned Murderhood.

      So, I guess this might be a good start. Or, in coldwarrior parlance. Its much easier to change the course of a 1969 Cadillac sedan de ville when the engine is running and you are behind the wheel, than it is when its out of gas, you’re locked out of it and the emergency brake is on.

      Caveat: In the event that the Cadillac in question has already been given the Thelma & Louise treatment and is 400 feet in the air doing 120 mph headed straight for the ground, being put in the drivers seat really is the worst thing that could possibly happen.


    26. coldwarrior
      26 | May 5, 2017 2:55 pm

      doriangrey wrote:

      After corporate America consolidated its hold on broadcast radio in the mid 80’s, that competition became a Kabuki theater of competition. Reality was, everyone was being fed the same pathetic pablum. The corporate “Risk aversion” that coldwarrior mentioned in his article above started there and quickly infested the record labels whose revenue source was mainly derived from broadcast radio’s ability to allow them to market their products.

      bingo.

      the story of double x in pgh comes to mind, in the 80’s they were playing all the stuff that the corporate hack stations would not play and they ended up being #1 in the market and INDIE!

      yeah, well, cant have that, they were bought out and turned into a below average country station or something like that.


    27. 27 | May 5, 2017 3:03 pm

      @ coldwarrior:

      You here to resuscitate this thread after I committed Lilycide on it?


    28. Deplorable Bumr50
      28 | May 5, 2017 3:58 pm

      I prefer Spotify to pandora@ coldwarrior:

      They have an online tribute station.

      https://www.radionomy.com/en/radio/xxradio-wxxppittsburgh-


    29. coldwarrior
      29 | May 5, 2017 5:16 pm

      Deplorable Bumr50 wrote:

      I prefer Spotify to pandora@ coldwarrior:

      They have an online tribute station.

      https://www.radionomy.com/en/radio/xxradio-wxxppittsburgh-

      NICE!


    30. coldwarrior
      30 | May 5, 2017 5:18 pm

      @ doriangrey:

      ha!

      no, i’m gettin ready to go to bed, i have a damned early shift tomorrow.


    31. 31 | May 5, 2017 5:27 pm

      coldwarrior wrote:

      @ doriangrey:

      ha!

      no, i’m gettin ready to go to bed, i have a damned early shift tomorrow.

      Somebody better call a “Code Black” on this thread then.


    32. AZfederalist
      32 | May 5, 2017 5:29 pm

      doriangrey wrote:

      They destroyed the unique character of individual radio stations and transformed broadcast radio in America into an unpalatable corporate gruel.

      Maybe that’s the reason I have pretty much stopped listening to the radio except when I am in the shop on weekends. I just put it down to Tucson, being pretty much a third world city, not having much choice in radio stations. I just can’t find anything that I enjoy listening to during the drive to and from work, it’s all pretty much the same thing. Even the classic hits station seems to be all Elton John all the time. Pretty much all of our stations are IHeartRadio stations. Had toyed with getting XM just for more variety, but haven’t got beyond toying with the idea


    33. coldwarrior
      33 | May 5, 2017 5:48 pm

      Deplorable Bumr50 wrote:

      I prefer Spotify to pandora@ coldwarrior:

      They have an online tribute station.

      https://www.radionomy.com/en/radio/xxradio-wxxppittsburgh-

      AND THEY HAVE MERCH!!!!


    34. coldwarrior
      34 | May 5, 2017 5:49 pm

      doriangrey wrote:

      Code Black

      you are never allowed to use those two words in that order…ever…

      😆


    35. 35 | May 5, 2017 7:36 pm

      @ coldwarrior:

      I thought spotify was more for adult contemporary music. I will have to check them out.


    36. rain of lead
      36 | May 5, 2017 8:11 pm

      new game that just came out

      PREY

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1hKTZGflqrc


    37. 38 | May 5, 2017 8:55 pm

      @ rain of lead:
      Trump & Putin are behind it. Trump is Putin’s lackey, and he’s a fascist, evil, racist, homophobic, misogynistic, idiotic, mentally ill madman.
      ///
      (I’ve tried using /// other places and nobody knows what it means).


    38. Deplorable Bumr50
      39 | May 5, 2017 8:57 pm

      @ Deplorable Barbarian:

      That was me with the Spotify preference. I was never a big Pandora fan so I switched to Slacker, but they cheaped out on a lot of bands I listen to so I went with Spotify.

      I use the offline playlist feature a lot, because I can’t get coverage in two of our facilities and they won’t let us use the WiFi. I’m sure Pandora has the same type of thing.

      Spotify has a lot of user generated playlists. Slacker and Pandora probably both beat it for a “radio” format.

      (Oh, and I give whichever one I’m using the ten bucks a month to not deal with ads. So I’m not sure how Spotify is with that.)


    39. Deplorable Bumr50
      40 | May 5, 2017 9:07 pm

      @ rain of lead:

      Is there anything in them?

      If not, isn’t it feasible that Macron himself hired the hackers to cry victim in an effort to piggyback on the claim that America’s election was hacked? Say if internal polling was tighter than what’s being publicized?


    40. rain of lead
      41 | May 5, 2017 9:10 pm

      @ Deplorable Bumr50:

      yeah, there seems to be some pretty big “there” there

      guess we’ll see if it has an impact


    41. rain of lead
      42 | May 5, 2017 9:18 pm

      huh
      flying pig moment

      1. An article about guns in the MSM by someone who doesn’t like them and doesn’t know anything about them,
      2. …that’s reasonably fair and not a hit piece,
      3. …and published by CNN.

      http://www.cnn.com/2017/04/28/world/indian-immigrant-nra-convention/index.html


    42. Deplorable Bumr50
      43 | May 5, 2017 9:47 pm

      @ rain of lead:

      If they’re not already being beaten with a rolled up newspaper for that, I’m sure they will be soon.


    43. AZfederalist
      44 | May 5, 2017 10:19 pm

      rain of lead wrote:

      yeah, there seems to be some pretty big “there” there

      guess we’ll see if it has an impact

      So much so that the French government has blocked 4Chan from the country


    44. AZfederalist
      45 | May 5, 2017 10:28 pm

      Deplorable Bumr50 wrote:

      @ rain of lead:

      If they’re not already being beaten with a rolled up newspaper for that, I’m sure they will be soon.

      I hope she does well at her next employer. She is an example of an objective reporter who actually learned something, was willing to write about it, and may have had some of her ideas changed by what she learned.


    45. AZfederalist
      46 | May 5, 2017 10:54 pm

      rain of lead wrote:

      huh
      flying pig moment

      1. An article about guns in the MSM by someone who doesn’t like them and doesn’t know anything about them,
      2. …that’s reasonably fair and not a hit piece,
      3. …and published by CNN.

      http://www.cnn.com/2017/04/28/world/indian-immigrant-nra-convention/index.html

      Shared your link on WZ, it’s a hit.


    46. eaglesoars
      47 | May 5, 2017 11:03 pm

      AZfederalist wrote:

      So much so that the French government has blocked 4Chan from the country

      that’s hilarious! The people at 4Chan are so clever, they’ll probably figure out a workaround


    47. AZfederalist
      52 | May 6, 2017 12:35 am

      Well, this should be entertaining:

      http://www.weaselzippers.us/337491-sacramento-public-housing-residents-just-got-free-electric-zipcars-from-boston/#comment-3291131541

      From WZ:

      Sacramento Public Housing Residents Just Got Free Electric Zipcars From Boston

      Via Sacramento Bee:

      Residents at three public housing areas now have a mini-fleet of free Zipcars to make their way around Sacramento.

      On Friday, Sacramento launched a pilot program that put eight shared electric Kia Souls at public housing sites. Up to 300 residents can apply for on-demand access to the vehicles, with no charge for maintenance, insurance or juicing up the battery.

      The program is funded through a $1.3 million grant from the California Air Resources Board using cap-and-trade funds that businesses pay to offset their carbon emissions.

      Local leaders said it will provide green transportation options to disadvantaged areas where even simple tasks like getting groceries can be a challenge.

      “Not having a car … it can be a real strain to get places safely,” said Thomas Hall, spokesman for the Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District, which is running the program in partnership with car-share company Zipcar and other governmental agencies.

      The cars are owned and maintained by Boston-based Zipcar, which has car-sharing operations in dozens of cities and on college campuses. Two cars are located at each of four sites: Alder Grove Housing Complex off Broadway, Edgewater apartments downtown, Mutual Housing at Lemon Hill in south Sacramento and the Sacramento Valley Station.


    48. eaglesoars
      53 | May 6, 2017 1:31 am

      I wonder what zipcar’s insurance policy looks like?


    49. AZfederalist
      54 | May 6, 2017 1:57 am

      @ eaglesoars:

      😆


    50. AZfederalist
      55 | May 6, 2017 2:06 am

      eaglesoars wrote:

      I wonder what zipcar’s insurance policy looks like?

      … and it will be California paying the costs. Doesn’t matter, taxpayer funds are an infinite resource.

      /I wonder how long the company I work for will maintain a presence in CA. We are currently being run by a bunch of liberal Gen-X’ers and millennials, but even they cannot ignore the damage to the company bottom line when employees in CA cost way more than those in other areas of the country


    51. 56 | May 6, 2017 3:10 am

      @ AZfederalist:

      Typical Marxist Utopia scheme.


    52. RIX
      57 | May 6, 2017 7:23 am

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y_PZPpWTRTU
      Good morning. Kentucky Derby today, and the favorite is………….


    53. 58 | May 6, 2017 10:28 am

      right_wing2 wrote:

      @ rain of lead:
      Trump & Putin are behind it. Trump is Putin’s lackey, and he’s a fascist, evil, racist, homophobic, misogynistic, idiotic, mentally ill madman.
      ///
      (I’ve tried using /// other places and nobody knows what it means).

      Which means they’re fucking idiots!!!


    54. RIX
      59 | May 6, 2017 2:39 pm

      Sho am dark in here.


    55. eaglesoars
      60 | May 6, 2017 3:09 pm

      Testicles. Trump has ’em.

      A State Department official on Friday said that the Russian proposal calling to bar U.S. military aircrafts from flying over designated safe zones cannot “limit” the U.S.’s mission against ISIS in the country in any way.

      “The coalition will continue to strike ISIS targets in Syria,” the official told The Wall Street Journal. “The campaign to defeat ISIS will continue at the same relentless pace as it is proceeding now.”

      Thanks for playing.


    56. RIX
      61 | May 6, 2017 3:50 pm

      http://www.nbcchicago.com/news/local/Huntington-Beach-family-booted-Delta-flight-421258184.html
      little more on the family on Delta that was removed over their two year old occupying a seat in a car seat.
      The did BUY an additional ticket for their older son on another flight. They did not exchange tickets and were
      told by a gate agent that the two year old could occupy that seat and recommended a car seat.
      Delta efed this up bigly.


    57. 62 | May 6, 2017 5:07 pm

      SHIT…. Shit shit shit….

      I just ran into the guy who did the drum work on my CD. He was my brothers good friend. He didn’t know that Cliff had died. SHIT SHIT SHIT…


    58. rain of lead
      63 | May 6, 2017 6:29 pm

      @ doriangrey:

      damn
      churned all the feelings right back up again.
      hang tough


    59. rain of lead
      64 | May 6, 2017 6:39 pm

      in booze news
      (CW, take note)

      A glen by any other name: Fargo whiskey survives Scotch test

      http://wtop.com/food-restaurant/2017/05/a-glen-by-any-other-name-fargo-whiskey-survives-scotch-test/


    60. 66 | May 6, 2017 7:10 pm

      rain of lead wrote:

      @ doriangrey:

      damn
      churned all the feelings right back up again.
      hang tough

      Churned them up big time.


    61. eaglesoars
      70 | May 6, 2017 8:31 pm

      Gun control is hitting the target

      HOUSTON – A homeowner shot three suspects and killed two of them during a drive-by shooting in north Houston, according to Houston Police.

      Offiers said late Friday night, three suspects in a four door car opened fire in front of a home on Glenburnie Drive and Mercedes Lane.

      The owner of the home returned fire and hit all three suspects inside the vehicle. Two of the suspects died from the gunshot wounds, officers said.

      The homeowner was not injured in the shooting.

      Officer said they are investigating the shooting as a case of self-defense.


    62. AZfederalist
      71 | May 6, 2017 8:50 pm

      eaglesoars wrote:

      Officer said they are investigating the shooting as a case of self-defense.

      Thank-you Captain Obvious.


    63. lobo91
      72 | May 6, 2017 8:57 pm

      AZfederalist wrote:

      eaglesoars wrote:

      Officer said they are investigating the shooting as a case of self-defense.

      Thank-you Captain Obvious.

      Justifiable Homey-cide, most likely…


    64. 73 | May 6, 2017 9:00 pm

      lobo91 wrote:

      Justifiable Homey-cide

      I don’t care who you are, that is funny.


    65. AZfederalist
      75 | May 6, 2017 9:30 pm

      eaglesoars wrote:

      ok who plays Hillary? I’m thinking Bette Midler

      Babs Streisand or M. Streep?


    66. 76 | May 6, 2017 9:40 pm

      eaglesoars wrote:

      “Shattered: Inside Hillary Clinton’s Doomed Campaign,” the best-selling book written by Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes, has been optioned by TriStar Television and Davis Entertainment as a limited television series, according to the New York Times.

      ok who plays Hillary? I’m thinking Bette Midler

      I’m thinking, who gets the staring roll of Dorothy, and gets to throw mop water on the wicked witch is the east?


    67. 77 | May 6, 2017 9:44 pm

      Back to watching Dr Who. http://couch-tuner.city/5/doctor-who-s10-e4-knock-knock/


    68. lobo91
      78 | May 6, 2017 9:47 pm

      Black Newspaper Columnist Who Defended NRA Quits After Suspension

      A conservative columnist who was suspended by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch after she defended the National Rifle Association from comparisons to ISIS fired back with her resignation and a series of targeted tweets.

      The newspaper on Friday suspended Stacy Washington after a column entitled “Guns and the Media” disputed an anti-NRA article that argued since more Americans die from guns than from ISIS, the Second Amendment advocacy group is the greater danger.

      “[W]hen has a member of the NRA ever decapitated, set on fire, tossed from a rooftop or otherwise terrorized another American? The linkage is not only rife with improper context; it is false on its face,” Washington wrote in her column, which also decried the lack of conservatives in U.S. newsrooms. “This failure to represent the opposing, especially conservative, view is an increasingly apparent deficit in the news reporting apparatus in our country.”

      The St. Louis Post-Dispatch asserts that Washington was not suspended for the views expressed in her column, but for failing to disclose her promotional work and professional affiliation with the NRA. Washington has appeared several times as a co-host and commentator on “Cam & Company” on NRA TV and contributed to an NRA documentary in August 2016. However, she has never been paid by the NRA.

      “Her active promotional activities and professional association with the National Rifle Association represented an unacceptable conflict of interest in her most recent column, which resulted in our suspension of her work,” Tod Robberson, the Post-Dispatch’s editorial page editor, wrote in a response to Washington’s suspension and quitting.

      Robberson added: “Columnists are expected to fully disclose conflicts of interest when writing about topics where such a conflict might arise. We apply this standard regardless of the lobbying or advocacy group being written about in a column.”

      Yeah…I’m sure they would have suspended her for working with Bloomberg’s astroturf group…


    69. eaglesoars
      79 | May 6, 2017 9:55 pm

      AZfederalist wrote:

      eaglesoars wrote:

      ok who plays Hillary? I’m thinking Bette Midler

      Babs Streisand or M. Streep?

      oh yeah streep but that’s such a gimme – straight to the oscars


    70. eaglesoars
      80 | May 6, 2017 9:57 pm

      doriangrey wrote:

      I’m thinking, who gets the staring roll of Dorothy, and gets to throw mop water on the wicked witch is the east?

      well, who plays kellyanne conway?

      Lena Dunham could play chelsea. oh gross.


    71. 81 | May 6, 2017 10:17 pm

      @ eaglesoars:
      Who plays Huma? Bill?


    72. AZfederalist
      82 | May 6, 2017 10:20 pm

      eaglesoars wrote:

      Lena Dunham could play chelsea. oh gross.

      Either way you slice that one


    73. Possum
      83 | May 6, 2017 10:27 pm

      I found a girl worth fighting for!

      Um not you Calo.. No more fights ever,

      🙂

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HiqmZLOaD8o


    74. eaglesoars
      84 | May 6, 2017 10:37 pm

      right_wing2 wrote:

      @ eaglesoars:
      Who plays Huma? Bill?

      don’t know yet. Sandra Bernhard could play Jennifer Palmieri


    75. eaglesoars
      85 | May 6, 2017 10:48 pm

      ah darken her hair and give her contact lenses – Natalie Portman for Huma


    76. eaglesoars
      86 | May 6, 2017 10:49 pm

      And Richard Dreyfus is Bernie


    77. eaglesoars
      87 | May 6, 2017 10:51 pm

      ok, Robert Redford for Bill


    78. AZfederalist
      88 | May 7, 2017 12:16 am

      eaglesoars wrote:

      ok, Robert Redford for Bill

      That works


    79. 89 | May 7, 2017 1:07 am

      Unfortunately we got our foster cat back today. His adoption didn’t work out since he didn’t get along with their cats. He needs to be an only cat.

      While I was waiting for the people who took him to go through the ‘surrender’ paperwork & everything, a couple brought in 7 cats. A mom, one other adult, and 5 kittens, including 2 who’d been born without eyes. Of course Mrs RW wants to see if we can foster them. Just what we need, 2 ‘special needs’ kittens (5 weeks old) on top of the zoo we have now AND on top of another foster who’s a bit of a pain in the neck.

      But who knows. Maybe the two of us are just who those kittens need.


    80. eaglesoars
      90 | May 7, 2017 8:19 am

      right_wing2 wrote:

      Maybe the two of us are just who those kittens need.

      *sigh* good luck. I went from being a never-again dog mom to TWO dogs w/special needs, one emotional, one physical. “Not my will but…” and you know the rest.


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