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  • NCAA Week #13 2019, RIVALRY WEEK open thread.

    by coldwarrior ( 82 Comments › )
    Filed under College Football, Open thread at November 29th, 2019 - 12:00 pm

    ITS AN OPEN.

    3 days off. Hangin’ at G’Ma and Papap Coldwarriors spread. They got their Christmas present early, a lovely turntable from these guys, we sprung for a Grado Black cartridge. It sounds great.

    Last week we were 1 for 1 and 25/47…1300/1000 overall.
    Welcome to Rivalry Week!

    FRIDAY:

    #17 Iowa at Nebraska – Fri, Nov 29, 2:30 PM ET…For some reason the Hawkeyes are giving 4.5. Nope, in this corn-fed battle it’s Iowa beating that spread.

    Washington State at Washington – Fri, Nov 29, 4:00 PM ET…Man, Atlantic City is giving WAZOO 7. They beat that spread.

    SATURDAY:

    #1 Ohio State at #13 Michigan – Sat, Nov 30, 12:00 PM ET…the houses are all the joint with this one. OSU will win, they had better because they looked like shit against PSU. I’m taking PSU to beat the AC line, they are giving M 7.5.

    #12 Wisconsin at #8 Minnesota – Sat, Nov 30, 3:30 PM ET…W is giving 2.5. Minnesota won’t cover and W wins.

    #5 Alabama at #15 Auburn – Sat, Nov 30, 3:30 PM ET…THE IRON BOWL…and ‘Bama is weak. Tua should not have been out on the field last week and now he has the Bo Jackson injury and surgery coming up. STUPID!!!! x100000!!!! C’mon Nick, you are smarter than that! Caesar’s has ‘Bama as a 3 point favorite. There is blood in the water. Auburn covers and probably wins.

    #16 Notre Dame at Stanford – Sat, Nov 30, 4:00 PM ET…The Good Catholic Boys are giving 17. This is usually a great game between two elite academic institutions. ND covers.

    Oregon State at #14 Oregon – Sat, Nov 30, 4:00 PM ET…The Ducks are 19 poinf favorites and covers.

    #7 Oklahoma at #21 Oklahoma State – Sat, Nov 30, 8:00 PM ET…This is always a great game. Caesar’s is giving OK 14…nope. OSU covers.

    Comments

    Comments and respectful debate are both welcome and encouraged.

    Comments are the sole opinion of the comment writer, just as each thread posted is the sole opinion or post idea of the administrator that posted it or of the readers that have written guest posts for the Blogmocracy.

    Obscene, abusive, or annoying remarks may be deleted or moved to spam for admin review, but the fact that particular comments remain on the site in no way constitutes an endorsement of their content by any other commenter or the admins of this Blogmocracy.

    We're not easily offended and don't want people to think they have to walk on eggshells around here (like at another place that shall remain nameless) but of course, there is a limit to everything.

    Play nice!

    82 Responses to “NCAA Week #13 2019, RIVALRY WEEK open thread.”
    ( jump to bottom )

    1. yenta-fada
      1 | November 29, 2019 5:22 pm

      Maybe this was already posted. but this great K9 is worth watching again.

      https://www.foxnews.com/us/new-york-police-k9-attacks-suspect


    2. eaglesoars
      2 | November 29, 2019 5:47 pm

      The London attacker was a known threat


      The attacker was a convicted terrorist who had recently been released from prison and was wearing an electronic tag, according to The Times

      The report added that he was a guest at a Cambridge University conference on prisoner rehabilitation at Fishmongers’ Hall – where the attack began – and later threatened to blow up the venue.

      It went on to quote unnamed Whitehall sources as saying the attacker had been released from prison around a year ago after serving time for a “terrorism-related offence”, and had agreed to wear an electronic tag.

      https://news.sky.com/story/london-bridge-police-dealing-with-incident-amid-reports-of-gunshots-11873515


    3. rain of lead
      3 | November 29, 2019 6:12 pm

      he was a guest at a Cambridge University conference on prisoner rehabilitation at Fishmongers’ Hall – where the attack began

      **blink*blink**

      guess it didn’t take


    4. rain of lead
      4 | November 29, 2019 6:16 pm

      5 people stabbed

      “let’s ban knives”
      “we already did that”
      “well then, lets ban SMALLER knives!”
      ” ummm….we did that too.”
      ” ?…?”


    5. coldwarrior
      7 | November 29, 2019 7:00 pm

      ok, aussie,

      i got dad watching cricket, NZ v eng.

      in the garage-mahal…beers and cigars. he likes it.

      cheers


    6. eaglesoars
      8 | November 29, 2019 8:58 pm

      I’m trying to verify, but apparently China is going to allow rice imports from the U.S. for the first time ever.

      To be clear, Trump just sold rice to China.

      carry on.


    7. 10 | November 29, 2019 9:36 pm

      We’re heading to Lumber Liquidators on Sunday to pick up flooring for the 2 downstairs bedrooms- my office and the guest room.

      There was a nice carpet in them when we moved in last year. Unfortunately the cats got closed in a couple of times, panicked, and tore the carpet up.

      This will make it easier anyway I think. The flooring will be waterproof, and it’s a wood flooring or at least looks like wood.


    8. yenta-fada
      11 | November 29, 2019 10:53 pm

      In my email. From 60 Minutes Australia. A full episode on a young Chinese man who has been spying for the Chinese alleges he has defected. He was involved in quashing the Democracy movement in HK, and working to change the President of Taiwan. Interviewer is Phillip
      Gregory. Aussie must know about this guy. 40 min.long if you are
      interested.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdR-I35Ladk&feature=youtu.be


    9. yenta-fada
      12 | November 29, 2019 11:09 pm

      @ yenta-fada:

      Nope Phillip Gregory is not the interviewer, just on for a short bit. We know this stuff, but some of you may have friends who are interested in Chinese global ambitions with HK in the news so much.


    10. Buckeye Abroad
      13 | November 30, 2019 4:32 am

      eaglesoars wrote:

      I’m trying to verify, but apparently China is going to allow rice imports from the U.S. for the first time ever.

      To be clear, Trump just sold rice to China.

      carry on.

      Bwahaha. Lot of pigs are learning to fly these days.


    11. 14 | November 30, 2019 5:53 am

      One of the things that’s really bothering me is that it appears that we’re living out the opening chapters of Atlas Shrugged as well as the Civilization Collapse part of the back story of Starship Troopers. Atlas Shrugged was written by Ayn Rand as a warning, not an instruction manual.


    12. rain of lead
      15 | November 30, 2019 6:21 am

      @ The Other Les:

      crazy years
      it;s the crazy years


    13. rain of lead
      16 | November 30, 2019 6:23 am

      oh, UT plays vandy at 3pm
      they need to win this and their bowl game to continue their creep back to relevance


    14. rain of lead
    15. coldwarrior
      18 | November 30, 2019 11:34 am

      rain of lead wrote:

      oh, UT plays vandy at 3pm
      they need to win this and their bowl game to continue their creep back to relevance

      they just played rocky top on the satellite music here in the garage-mahal. (papap colwarrior has quite the setup!)

      this is an auspicious event, The VOLs Win today.

      yinz is welcome!


    16. lobo91
      19 | November 30, 2019 11:59 am


    17. coldwarrior
      20 | November 30, 2019 12:10 pm

      some good cigars, great beer, smoked meat, M v OSU on the TV in the garage-mahal, hangin with Papap Coldwarrior…

      It’s already a great day!

      GO BLUE!!!!

      (my great uncle went to M Law, so i have to root for them, sorry doppleganger.)


    18. lobo91
      21 | November 30, 2019 12:49 pm

      This is interesting:


    19. eaglesoars
      22 | November 30, 2019 12:53 pm

      This. Is. Bullshit.

      There is a bill proposed in the Virginia Senate to make it a felony to train somebody how to use a firearm if you have reasonable understanding they will use it to hurt other people. This is structured as an anti-paramilitary thing, but it isn’t. Virginia SB 64

      1. Teaches or demonstrates to any other person the use, application, or making of any firearm, explosive, or incendiary device, or technique capable of causing injury or death to persons, knowing or having reason to know or intending that such training will be employed for use in, or in furtherance of, a civil disorder; or

      2. Assembles with one or more persons for the purpose of training with, practicing with, or being instructed in the use of any firearm, explosive, or incendiary device, or technique capable of causing injury or death to persons, intending to employ such training for use in, or in furtherance of, a civil disorder; or

      more at the link

      http://lis.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/legp604.exe?201+ful+SB64&fbclid=IwAR2LZ8qWZ8VJq93plQdjlqqi9zI2xPPla-tdmJBlxJ_UddpCLZbmQjEGcVM


    20. lobo91
      23 | November 30, 2019 1:05 pm

      @ eaglesoars:

      There is a bill proposed in the Virginia Senate to make it a felony to train somebody how to use a firearm if you have reasonable understanding they will use it to hurt other people. This is structured as an anti-paramilitary thing, but it isn’t. Virginia SB 64

      And it’s probably not a coincidence that the world’s largest firearms training organization is headquartered in Virginia (although it’s incorporated in NY).


    21. eaglesoars
      24 | November 30, 2019 1:26 pm

      @ lobo91:

      I’ve already emailed the ILA dept.

      The sponsor is a Louise Lucas from the Portsmouth area (I think – district 18). Nice black lady, Baptist church, all that stuff.

      The bill is short, but it’s about as unconstitutional as it gets, from start to finish. The 1st, the 2nd, I don’t know what is violated by holding someone responsible for what someone may do in the future. I don’t think we’ve got an amendment that covers violation of known physics.


    22. 26 | November 30, 2019 2:10 pm

      Whenever I hear news of the impeachment of President Trump I feel like a Jew hiding in Nazi Germany.


    23. rain of lead
      27 | November 30, 2019 4:39 pm

      3-0 vandy


    24. rain of lead
      28 | November 30, 2019 5:06 pm

      7-3 vols at the end of the 1st


    25. rain of lead
      29 | November 30, 2019 5:26 pm

      14-3 vols
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=avAD4CX1IzY


    26. rain of lead
      30 | November 30, 2019 5:36 pm

      94 yd run for the vols
      21-3


    27. rain of lead
      31 | November 30, 2019 7:22 pm

      28-10 vols

      7:38 left in 4th qtr and lightning delay


    28. Aussie Infidel
      32 | November 30, 2019 7:26 pm

      eaglesoars wrote:

      I’m trying to verify, but apparently China is going to allow rice imports from the U.S. for the first time ever.

      To be clear, Trump just sold rice to China.

      carry on.

      he REALLY tough rice market is NO China who already eat Thai rice. The REALLY tough market is JAPAN who have a quasi-religious thingie about only eating Japanese grown rice. Shinto and all that. The Australians have a small toe into the Japanese rice door but it’s tiny.


    29. rain of lead
      33 | November 30, 2019 7:26 pm

      48-45 auburn 4th qtr


    30. Aussie Infidel
      34 | November 30, 2019 7:30 pm

      eaglesoars wrote:

      @ lobo91:

      I’ve already emailed the ILA dept.

      The sponsor is a Louise Lucas from the Portsmouth area (I think – district 18). Nice black lady, Baptist church, all that stuff.

      The bill is short, but it’s about as unconstitutional as it gets, from start to finish. The 1st, the 2nd, I don’t know what is violated by holding someone responsible for what someone may do in the future. I don’t think we’ve got an amendment that covers violation of known physics.

      Just loverly !

      Only untrained nutters running around Va shooting each other and themselves accidentally.

      Sounds like someone’s ‘wet dream’. Tell them to get cleaned up and go back too sleep!

      🙂


    31. rain of lead
      35 | November 30, 2019 7:30 pm

      @ rain of lead:
      final
      bama loses


    32. eaglesoars
      36 | November 30, 2019 7:38 pm

      Aussie Infidel wrote:

      Sounds like someone’s ‘wet dream’.

      It is – whatever else it may be – a direct attack on the NRA. They do a lot of training, that’s where I got mine.

      And, btw, paramilitary orgs are not illegal.


    33. lobo91
      37 | November 30, 2019 8:05 pm

      Someone finally posted video of Larkin Poe’s second show at the Big Blues Bender. This is the one I missed, because they changed the time on it. The set list was significantly different from the show in the big room the night before:


    34. eaglesoars
      38 | November 30, 2019 8:31 pm

      @ lobo91:

      You should get a job as their roadie.

      Guess what? One of the people killed in the London Bridge stabbing was a Univ Student working on his thesis. His thesis title

      “A Critical Analysis of the Over-Represntation of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic Males Age 18-21 in the British Prison System”.

      The jihadi and this victim were both attending a rehabilitation conference, where the slaughter began.

      https://twitter.com/Zod14_/status/1200937578112987136/photo/1


    35. Aussie Infidel
      39 | November 30, 2019 8:39 pm

      The Other Les wrote:

      Whenever I hear news of the impeachment of President Trump I feel like a Jew hiding in Nazi Germany.

      That’s the total wrong way of looking at it mate.

      Think of yourself as the armoured spearhead Heavy tank brigade group of Patton’s Army South crushing the progressive enemy under your tracks.

      To quote the great man himself…

      ” we’re not going to defeat these bastards, we are going to slaughter them by the bushel. We are going to cut out their living guts and use them to grease the tracks of our tanks” …. Patton

      🙂

      Now there is a commander after my own heart

      🙂


    36. Aussie Infidel
      40 | November 30, 2019 8:45 pm

      eaglesoars wrote:

      Aussie Infidel wrote:

      Sounds like someone’s ‘wet dream’.

      It is – whatever else it may be – a direct attack on the NRA. They do a lot of training, that’s where I got mine.

      And, btw, paramilitary orgs are not illegal.

      I have just 3 more weeks to surrender my 4x high capacity magazines to the cops. Not sure whether to destroy them with a hammer and dump them in the rubbish or take them along and get my $70 bucks for them. They are still in their original plastic packaging. Hell I don’t trust the senior management within the Police not to keep track and records of all who volunteered to bring in the soon to be illegal arms and parts……

      ….and I come from a Police family… Both my dad and my son were/ are cops!


    37. Aussie Infidel
      41 | November 30, 2019 8:47 pm

      eaglesoars wrote:

      The jihadi and this victim were both attending a rehabilitation conference, where the slaughter began.

      Darwin would approve.

      🙂


    38. eaglesoars
      42 | November 30, 2019 8:52 pm

      Aussie Infidel wrote:

      I have just 3 more weeks to surrender my 4x high capacity magazines to the cops.

      DO NOT DO IT

      Jesus, Aussie, dig a hole


    39. Aussie Infidel
      43 | November 30, 2019 9:15 pm

      @ eaglesoars:
      HEH!

      When this BS happened in Oz the numbers of very large heavy duty map tubes sold went ballistic. A mate of mine a Senior Council operating at the District and High Courtlevel, ‘stored’ his dad’s Model ’94 Winchester 30-30 as well as other assorted firearms AS DID A LARGE NUMBER OF JUDGES they he knew personally, and other senior SENIOR GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS that intimated that they has ‘lost track’ of their firearms over the years.

      🙂


    40. 44 | November 30, 2019 9:48 pm

      Read this recently:

      During the U.S. campaign against al Qaida terrorists in Afghanistan, the U.S. government offered hefty bounties for al Qaida, Taliban, and other insurgent leaders. These bounties were highly publicized although rarely collected.

      U.S. Central Command decided to toy with the terrorist commanders: Military and intelligence analysts drew up a list of high-value targets, followed by a public announcement that the bounty on a particular terrorist leader had been slashed Word was whispered in the local markets that the man wasn’t worth the higher reward because he had been injured or been deemed incompetent.

      According to Eric Schmitt and Thom Shanker of The New York Times, the “less-valuable leader” then wanted “to prove he was still important and worthy of the higher bounty. Even senior members of al Qaida’s global network had been suckered by the ruse and were picked up after they made themselves visible not long after the bounty on their heads was reduced.”

      Norman Polmar, “To Understand Russian Submarines, Think Outside The Box” USNI Proceedings, October 2019. http://www.usni.org

      I have two questions. Why did the NYT publicize the tactic, and why did USNI echo it?


    41. AZfederalist
      45 | November 30, 2019 11:09 pm

      eaglesoars wrote:

      Guess what? One of the people killed in the London Bridge stabbing was a Univ Student working on his thesis. His thesis title

      “A Critical Analysis of the Over-Represntation of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic Males Age 18-21 in the British Prison System”.

      Well, you know what they say about karma. … too bad he didn’t survive; now he will never know the irony; but the rest of us will.


    42. AZfederalist
      46 | November 30, 2019 11:30 pm

      doriangrey wrote:

      rain of lead wrote:

      video

      https://www.weaselzippers.us/438511-man-attacks-people-with-knife-on-london-bridge-in-suspected-terror-attack-taken-out-by-police/

      https://twitter.com/ScottAdamsSays/status/1200826261934751744?s=20

      … and you know some MP in Formerly Great Britain is drafting legislation to make use of a fire extinguisher or animal horns illegal and prosecutable.


    43. 47 | December 1, 2019 11:00 am

      @ Aussie Infidel:

      4 inch diameter 2 foot long ABS pipe with cleanout threaded plugs on both ends. Nice hole in the ground somewhere in the backyard easy to remember and find. Some assembly required.


    44. eaglesoars
      48 | December 1, 2019 12:42 pm

      More gun garbage from Virginia. SB 16. This bill is long and in legalese. You have to scroll down to get to the firearms part. Aside from trying to redefine ‘assault weapon’, there’s this:

      A. Any person who imports, sells, barters, or transfers any firearm magazine that is designed to hold more than 10 rounds of ammunition is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor.

      And my shotgun is about to become illegal, as it holds over 7 rounds. (it’s ok if you’re hunting, but I don’t know what is hunted with a shotgun. It’s illegal to use them for deer).

      http://lis.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/legp604.exe?201+ful+SB16

      And at first I thought this was a joke, but it’s not

      Baltimore Museum of Art will only acquire works from women next year: ‘You have to do something radical’

      In addition, each of the 22 exhibits on view will have a female-centric focus. Nineteen will showcase artworks exclusively by women and will include works by at least one transgender woman, Zackary Drucker, a Los Angeles-based artist and consultant for the Amazon original television series “Transparent.”

      https://www.baltimoresun.com/entertainment/arts/bs-fe-bma-female-artists-2020-20191115-33s5hjjnqfghzhmwkt7dqbargq-story.html

      The lesbians are going to go bat guano.


    45. AZfederalist
      49 | December 1, 2019 12:51 pm

      eaglesoars wrote:

      Baltimore Museum of Art will only acquire works from women next year: ‘You have to do something radical’

      Are they going to include trans artists in that? Because that’s the next big thing. … and if so, then if they include men identifying as women, they are right back where they started.


    46. eaglesoars
      50 | December 1, 2019 1:06 pm

      Now here’s a hot take for ya!

      “If the police had known how to disarm a simple suicide vest, Usman Khan would still be alive. Instead, they killed him.”

      I demand to know why the @metpoliceuk didn’t know it was a fake suicide vest, only in tomorrow’s Guardian.

      What is it with these people and I DEMAND?

      https://twitter.com/shaniquaotoole/status/1200926571135148032


    47. eaglesoars
      51 | December 1, 2019 1:24 pm

      AZfederalist wrote:

      Are they going to include trans artists in that?

      Yes, I included that part, Zackary Drucker. That’s why the lesbians are going to pitch a fit.


    48. 52 | December 1, 2019 3:41 pm

      @ eaglesoars:
      A parody account maybe?


    49. Possum
      53 | December 1, 2019 3:45 pm

      right_wing2 wrote:

      @ eaglesoars:
      A parody account maybe?

      Yep!

      Now following it. He/She/it/them/they post some funny shit.

      https://twitter.com/shaniquaotoole


    50. Aussie Infidel
      54 | December 1, 2019 4:03 pm

      eaglesoars wrote:

      Now here’s a hot take for ya!

      “If the police had known how to disarm a simple suicide vest, Usman Khan would still be alive. Instead, they killed him.”

      I demand to know why the @metpoliceuk didn’t know it was a fake suicide vest, only in tomorrow’s Guardian.

      What is it with these people and I DEMAND?

      https://twitter.com/shaniquaotoole/status/1200926571135148032

      Shaniqua is so full of guano that it dribbles from his lips.

      Sure the cops could have disarmed the suicide belt by instantly knowing whether the muslim murderer had a ‘deadman’s switch’ initiator, a positive pressure detonator or was operating with a ‘handler’ from an overwatch position with access to a secondary radio initiation detonator.

      Surrre they could!

      Shaniqua is just another useful idiot giving cover to these terrorist arseholes and he should be monitored in case he takes his support to the next level and begins to get more closely involved with these terrorist punks.

      I want the cops to at least operate on a level playing field or even better operating from a positive advantage. If a terrorist is identified and has the potential to kill civilians or security forces then that is more than enough reason to immediately use lethal force against them. Let allah sort out the resulting deaths of his henchmen post action report.


    51. eaglesoars
      55 | December 1, 2019 4:07 pm

      right_wing2 wrote:

      @ eaglesoars:
      A parody account maybe?

      oh yeah, the pic is a dead giveaway (that’s a guy). He’s enormous fun, I don’t know who he is really but he’s just as good as Tatiana McGrath.


    52. RIX
      56 | December 1, 2019 4:19 pm

      Greetings & salutations. Just a comment about the games yesterday. What in hell happened to Michigan
      The clobbered a good Notre Dame team. Granted Ohio State is the number 1 team in the country, but still.


    53. Possum
      57 | December 1, 2019 4:25 pm

      Turkey is delicious, nutritious and easy to cook in the oven. Just put it in a roasting pan, cover with foil, set the oven to 325F and forget about it for several hours.

      Today I spent just over $21 to buy turkey. ( about £16 UK )

      How much turkey did I get? Well six of the damn things, freezer is now full. It was on sale at 25 cents per pound so I have over 84 pounds of prime, succulent frozen turkey.

      Thank you people of Iowa for working so hard in unpleasant and hazardous conditions all year round so the people in Houston can buy turkey that is cheaper than cat food.

      Thank you Iowa!


    54. 58 | December 1, 2019 4:47 pm

      @ Possum:
      Turkey’s have been going on sale here in the Great White North off and on for the past month at about 97 cents a pound. Wish I had a larger freezer to stock up on cheap protein.


    55. eaglesoars
      59 | December 1, 2019 4:48 pm

      @ Possum:

      84 POUNDS!!!!

      Get a dog


    56. Possum
      60 | December 1, 2019 4:56 pm

      eaglesoars wrote:

      @ Possum:

      84 POUNDS!!!!

      Get a dog

      Calo knows a few.

      To be honest I have a sort of guilt about buying human food and then feeding it to dogs and cats but there were many freezers of them.

      Went on sale 28th, still loads on 1st Dec.

      Also “Eat by date” is August 2020 so why are they on sale so cheap?


    57. AZfederalist
      61 | December 1, 2019 4:57 pm

      eaglesoars wrote:

      Now here’s a hot take for ya!

      “If the police had known how to disarm a simple suicide vest, Usman Khan would still be alive. Instead, they killed him.”

      I demand to know why the @metpoliceuk didn’t know it was a fake suicide vest, only in tomorrow’s Guardian.

      What is it with these people and I DEMAND?

      https://twitter.com/shaniquaotoole/status/1200926571135148032

      It was a parody post


    58. 62 | December 1, 2019 5:00 pm

      @ Possum:
      Government regulations. All food must have a “Best Before” date for sale. Some makes sense like fresh meats, vegetables, and baked products. Most others are just there to keep people comfortable. Properly frozen foods are good for longer then their BB dates as well as canned goods. Others it’s mostly a freshness and taste factor versus safety factor.


    59. Calo
      63 | December 1, 2019 5:00 pm

      @ Possum:
      The daughter wiped out my freezer Friday. Took everything she can cook or heat up, sooo…. there’s room now for a turkey or two for the pups.


    60. Possum
      64 | December 1, 2019 5:23 pm

      Calo wrote:

      @ Possum:
      The daughter wiped out my freezer Friday. Took everything she can cook or heat up, sooo…. there’s room now for a turkey or two for the pups.

      Well, I have five in freezer and one of the two I got today had to go in the fridge. No more room.

      There are still a shit load left at Walmart. Is there not a church or charity here that could use some? Mattress Mac?

      Missed seeing the evil spawn Thanksgiving, but she needed to go study.


    61. 65 | December 1, 2019 9:59 pm

      If you haven’t seen Midway, go. Go soon. Incredible movie.


    62. Aussie Infidel
      66 | December 1, 2019 10:16 pm

      eaglesoars wrote:

      Aussie Infidel wrote:

      I have just 3 more weeks to surrender my 4x high capacity magazines to the cops.

      DO NOT DO IT

      Jesus, Aussie, dig a hole

      As ever you were 100% correct in your analysis Eagles.

      The Police database that was tracking the ‘Gun buy back scheme’ just got hacked. ALL and mean ALL of the current Names of people surrendering arms, their Addresses, their Banking details, their car registration numbers, and their current Firearms licence numbers and what arms they still hold was stolen.

      It is a menu for criminals to target residences where arms are stored, as well as bank account details just asking to be hacked as well.

      I took your sage advice Eagles!

      🙂


    63. Aussie Infidel
      67 | December 1, 2019 10:18 pm

      right_wing2 wrote:

      If you haven’t seen Midway, go. Go soon. Incredible movie.

      How does it end?

      Does the Japanese carrier force still end up rusting away quietly on the bottom of the North Pacific

      🙂


    64. Aussie Infidel
      68 | December 1, 2019 10:31 pm

      @ right_wing2:
      Why… why…why do bloody Directors have to go and spoil a perfectly good movie with to not put too fine a point on it… BULLSHIT.

      The Japanese Zeros machine gunning folks diving for cover on Kalakaua Ave is just nonsense. It doesn’t add anything to the movie except to show of some CGI artists wet dream. Actually that sort of CGI over the top treatment detracts so much from modern movies. Just because you can do ‘stuff’ doesn’t mean that you have to do ‘stuff’.

      Every Director needs a partner whispering in his ear. all the time, does that add something to a movie that you can do without getting into the realms of bullshit for bullshit sake. Can we get a grown up movie that doesn’t depend on show-mo CGI just to pull in the short attention span kidult popcorn brigade?

      Sheesh.

      This could have been such a good movie… until the Director and probably a PR group think and their CGI hangers – on went wild with his budget…. because … well just because he could!


    65. Aussie Infidel
      69 | December 1, 2019 11:15 pm

      FBI Diagnosed With CIA Disease

      An inspector general’s report underscores how the FBI departed from its tradition of professionalism and honesty in pursuit of domestic political influence.
      Angelo Codevilla
      – November 28th, 2019
      The Justice Department’s inspector general this month reprimanded the FBI for the manner in which it recruits and supervises its “confidential human sources.” To the layman, this seems about technicalities. In fact, it shows that one of the CIA’s deadliest dysfunctions now infects the FBI as well.

      This disease consists of choosing and rejecting sources for the purpose of indulging the agencies’ and their leaders’ private agendas rather than to further intelligence work on the public’s behalf.

      Necessarily, the language of the inspector general’s November 19 report is vague: “Ineffective management and oversight of confidential sources.” This means the FBI has failed to use “adequate controls” in its validation of human sources, which has resulted in “jeopardizing FBI operations, and placing FBI agents, sources, subjects of investigation, and the public in harm’s way.”

      The inspector general’s concern with the FBI’s source management stems from the investigation into the FBI’s involvement in the 2016 presidential campaign, including by taking seriously the infamous Steele dossier that it knew was a fabrication as well as, likely, some Russian communication intercepts that also should have been rejected on strictly professional grounds. In short, the FBI departed from its tradition of professionalism and honesty in pursuit of domestic political influence.

      Choosing and recruiting sources, validating and managing them, is the very heart of intelligence. Doing it badly, taking sources that come easy—especially dispensing with due skepticism about the ones that contribute to one’s own agendas—is professional corruption. But doing it right is hard. To the extent that intelligence agencies find it difficult to fulfill expectations, they are tempted to substitute such corruption for the competence they lack. The pursuit of agency interests or even personal agendas takes over.

      CIA Disease
      Soon after the Central Intelligence Agency’s founding in 1947, Hanson Baldwin, the New York Times’ legendary military correspondent, had already noticed that the agency was using perfunctorily vetted-sources, or the officers’ own opinions, to fill the gap between the few modest secrets of which it could be sure, and the many big questions on which it was pronouncing itself.

      CIA case officers, ivy leaguers whose “cover” was a thin pretense, were never able to recruit Soviet officials and tore at each other over whether those who offered themselves were for real. They solved the problem by subordinating counterintelligence (i.e., quality control) to what they felt was the need to tell the stories they wanted to tell.

      During my years on the Senate Intelligence Committee’s staff, CIA officials’ preference for their personal and corporate interests over professional standards continued to get worse. It turned out that every last one of the Cubans they thought were our agents were actually working for Cuban intelligence. In East Germany, the United States had not a single “good” agent. Not only had CIA never recruited even one high-level Soviet agent, but for a decade, Aldrich Ames, CIA’s own chief of counterintelligence for the Soviet Union/Russia, the man who validated the Russians who offered their services and oversaw our operations in that country, worked for the KGB.

      So congenial did the agency find the disinformation coming its way that it was reluctant to investigate. Finally, when it did suspect that the dispatches coming from our agents had been crafted by the KGB, it sent them on to the president anyway because, according to the inspector general, “they contained thoughts they believed the President should consider.”

      In short, CIA officials—and not just a few people at the top—have so valued their own opinions, have so wanted to influence U.S. policy, that they have mistaken their own opinions and desires for the truth.

      The FBI Catches the Disease

      The FBI used to be different. Unlike the CIA’s faux aristos, the first generations of FBI agents were cops first. They had graduated from places like Fordham, a blue-collar Catholic university in the Bronx. Like all good cops, they knew the difference between the people on whose behalf they worked, and those who threatened them. Like TV’s Sergeant Joe Friday, they wore white shirts and said, “Yes, sir,” and “Yes, ma’am.” Unlike CIA case officers, FBI officers mixed with the kinds of people they investigated, and often went undercover themselves.

      Robert Mueller’s directorship, followed by his friend James Comey’s, made the FBI into the domestic danger it is today.

      The FBI used to take counterintelligence seriously. That made it possible for them to neutralize threats to America—the old joke was that, in any meeting of the U.S, Communist Party or of its front groups, a majority of attendees were FBI agents. The only U.S. intelligence penetration of the Kremlin was the FBI’s recruitment of a U.S. labor activist whom high-level Soviets trusted.

      In the late 1970s, that began to change. Director William Webster (1978-1987) failed to back up the officers who had infiltrated and surveilled the New Left’s collaboration with the Soviets against America in the Vietnam War. Webster also introduced contemporary political correctness into the FBI. Asked by the Senate Intelligence Committee why his FBI had neither infiltrated nor disrupted the Jim Jones cult that resulted in the deaths of 900 Americans in Jonestown, Guyana, Webster answered that he would no more have interfered with that religion than with the Catholic Church. Not incidentally, that cult was associated with the Democratic Party.

      In due course, FBI officials became standard bureaucrats and learned to operate on the assumption that all Americans were equally likely to be proper targets of investigation. They replaced the distinctions by which they had operated with the classic bureaucratic imperative: look out for yourselves by making sure not to displease the powerful.

      Webster’s FBI joined the ACLU as the principal sponsor of the 1978 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), which judicially pre-cleared all electronic surveillance operations through ex parte secret proceedings, despite warnings that such pre-clearance amounts to warrants for warrantless surveillance, and hence that it incentivizes political abuse.

      The directorships of William Sessions and Louis Freeh, ending in 2001, did nothing to slow the FBI’s devolution. Two additional tendencies developed, which further contributed to the devaluation of what had been scrupulous recruitment and evaluation of sources. First, reliance on pseudoscientific “profiling” vastly reduced the felt need for scruples. But the FBI’s experience with profiles is as powerful an argument as can be made of how debilitating, noxious, and corrupting reliance on them can be. Thus did the bureau practically convict an innocent man, Richard Jewell, of having bombed Centennial Park during the 1996 Atlanta Olympics.

      Second, the bureau’s increasing adoption of military weapons and tactics further tempted its officials to shortcut intelligence for the sake of, well, war against disfavoured persons and movements.

      The FBI in 1992 conducted an 11-day war against Randy Weaver and his family in a remote Idaho cabin, in which one law enforcement officer was killed along with the Weavers’ 14-year-old son, and which ended with an FBI sniper killing Weaver’s wife, Vicki, with a baby in her arms—leading to an angry jury acquitting Weaver. A year later, the FBI ran another war against a religious cult in Texas, that cost four lives.

      Robert Mueller’s directorship (2001-2013), followed by his friend James Comey’s, made the FBI into the domestic danger it is today.

      The investigation into the letters containing weapons-grade Anthrax, which killed five and injured 17 Americans, defined Mueller’s directorship and today’s FBI.

      No one was ever charged with the crime.

      From the beginning, the FBI’s “profiling” process concluded that no foreign government or entity had been responsible, but rather that the attacks had been the work of a lone, white, conservative scientist.

      Thus the bureau pursued and nearly broke Steven Hatfill, whose lawsuit the government settled for $ 5.8 million.

      The FBI then turned its attention to someone else who fit its profile, Bruce Edward Ivins.

      He was never charged. The bureau ruined his reputation and hounded Ivans into suicide.

      After which the bureau declared him guilty, but refused to make public the evidence on which it had reached its conclusion.

      Reassuring, isn’t it?

      To be sure, the current inspector general’s general reprimand of the FBI “ineffective management and oversight of confidential sources,” for the lack of “adequate controls” in its validation of human sources,” for “jeopardizing FBI operations, and placing FBI agents, sources, subjects of investigation, and the public in harm’s way,” refers primarily to the bureau’s massive political malfeasance since 2016.

      But that malfeasance results from a disease that goes beyond politics, a disease that has sapped the moral and professional character of a class of people for at least a half-century.

      Alas, in the current political environment, only political reactions are possible.

      Angelo Codevilla

      Angelo M. Codevilla is a senior fellow of the Claremont Institute, professor emeritus of international relations at Boston University and the author of To Make…


    66. 70 | December 1, 2019 11:16 pm

      @ Aussie Infidel:
      And that’s a nit a friend of mine, a history teacher, picked.


    67. Aussie Infidel
      71 | December 1, 2019 11:32 pm

      The major failing that Security Agency recruiters make is recruiting people just like themselves. This goes 1000% for the recruiting of Counter INTEL agents. CI agents should be ‘outsiders’ recruited for their depth of character and their analysis skills.They should NEVER be a part of the agency In-Crowd.

      CI is the major failure and weak spot in ALL western security agencies.The Russians and now the Chinese can’t believe how amateur-hour their opposing CI personnel were/are. No wonder the whole CIA operation in China was rolled up last year by the Chinese CI professionals.

      Pathetic is a description that springs to mind!

      https://www.newslocker.com/en-us/news/general-news/ex-cia-officer-charged-with-compromising-entire-us-spy-network-in-china/view/

      The worst offenders are the Brits and Canadians with the US and Australians not far behind! A very good friend was a director of CI in two agencies and resigned in disgust in the end due to the pathetic blindness verging on treason that was on display in an Australian (alphabet) Agency senior directorate.


    68. Aussie Infidel
      72 | December 1, 2019 11:37 pm

      right_wing2 wrote:

      @ Aussie Infidel:
      And that’s a nit a friend of mine, a history teacher, picked.

      Then why put it in? I know some group publicity study found it necessary to pander to the kidult popcorn scoffing, short attention span, cohort that is addicted to flashing lights. loud explosions and banal ”set pieces’ of cinema


    69. Aussie Infidel
      73 | December 1, 2019 11:50 pm

      Nobody wants aggressive Ci .
      Lawyers hate it
      Targets hate it
      Bureaucrats fear it
      Foreign penetration agents fear it
      The directorate abhor it for career terminating reasons

      everybody hates it !

      That’s why only ‘outsiders’ can ‘do it’ successfully.


    70. Aussie Infidel
      74 | December 1, 2019 11:52 pm

      @ right_wing2:
      Did the movie go into what happened BEFORE the Battle in the SW Pacific?


    71. 75 | December 2, 2019 2:51 am

      Antisemitism is the political equivalent of a canary in the coal mine. I can’t say this enough.


    72. 76 | December 2, 2019 2:57 am

      @ right_wing2:
      The domestic danger of the FBI became clear with the Waco Massacre.


    73. rain of lead
      77 | December 2, 2019 6:04 am

      now this is cool

      Hershey Bears’ teddy bear toss shatters world record as 45,650 stuffed animals hit the ice for charity

      https://www.pennlive.com/sports/2019/12/watch-hershey-bears-teddy-bear-toss-shatters-world-record-as-45650-stuffed-animals-hit-the-ice-for-charity.html


    74. eaglesoars
      80 | December 2, 2019 11:13 am

      Just hypothestically – IF – just IF – I decided to finally get my very own
      AR-15 for Christmas – who makes the one I should get? Keeping in mind I can customize it later BUT I have to learn how to clean the damn thing, etc., Do I want a simple .223 barrel or a hybrid, etc. I realize I’m going to have to play with a few, because some may simply be too heavy for me to use reliably.

      But right now, I’m looking at

      Colt LE6922

      Sig Sauer M400

      Armalite, of course

      Comments welcome…………..


    75. eaglesoars
      81 | December 2, 2019 11:28 am

      Add Ruger AR-556 MPR


    76. AZfederalist
      82 | December 2, 2019 11:47 am

      eaglesoars wrote:

      Just hypothestically – IF – just IF – I decided to finally get my very own
      AR-15 for Christmas – who makes the one I should get? Keeping in mind I can customize it later BUT I have to learn how to clean the damn thing, etc., Do I want a simple .223 barrel or a hybrid, etc. I realize I’m going to have to play with a few, because some may simply be too heavy for me to use reliably.

      But right now, I’m looking at

      Colt LE6922

      Sig Sauer M400

      Armalite, of course

      Comments welcome…………..

      I have the Ruger SR-556, a gas piston system instead of direct impingement gas. It is no longer made, but I believe they have other gas piston systems out there. IMO, they are easier to keep clean because the gases are constrained to the piston and not the entire cycling mechanism. Lobo probably has some good information. As long as you go with a name-brand, you probably can’t go wrong — go try handling a few to see what fits you best.


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